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Displaying items by tag: black horses

Syracuse — At the Carrier Dome in Syracuse on Friday, Dec. 3, Chenango Forks captured the Class C State Football Championship title over Schuylerville – the 7th State Football Championship for the Blue Devils. Final score: 21-0. 

To lead Chenango Forks to victory, Z. Arnold had a 21 yd. TD run in the second quarter and D. Haqq had a 28 yd. TD run and 7 yd. TD run in the third and fourth quarters. D. Hogan was 3 for 3 on extra points. 

Chenango Forks had 304 total yards. Lead rushers were Haqq with 20 carries for 133 yds. and 2 TDs, Arnold with 22 carries for 107 yds. and 1 TD, and G. Stark with 6 carries for 20 yds. Passing, QB Stark was 3 for 6 for 41 yds. Haqq had 2 receptions for 30 yds. and Arnold had 1 reception for 11 yds. 

Schuylerville had 127 total yards. Top rusher for the Black Horses was L. Sherman with 11 carries for 25 yds. Passing, QB O. Sherman was 12 for 28 for 117 yds. R. Dow had 6 receptions for 57 yds., L. Sherman had 1 reception for 28 yds., Z. Bowen and Otto Bolduc both had 2 receptions for 13 yds., and Ollie Bolduc had 1 reception for 6 yds. 

Schuylerville finishes their season 13-1; this is the Black Horses second lost to Chenango Forks in the Championship. Their record is 31-3 over the past three years, being undefeated in the regular season. 

Published in Sports

Black Horses Head to Semi-Finals

The Black Horses Varsity Football Team had another shutout win in post-season play – a 52-0 defeat against Ogdensburg Free Academy in the Class C State Quarterfinals on Saturday, Nov. 20. 

In the first quarter, R. Dow got the scoring started with a 1 yd. TD run, followed by a pass from O. Sherman to Z. Bowen for the 2 pt. conversion. 

O. Sherman threw five TDs to Dow – a 46 yd. pass and 34 yd. pass in the first quarter, a 34 yd. pass (2 pt. conversion completed by L. Sherman) and a 14 yd. pass in the second quarter (2 pt. conversion completed by O. Sherman to L. Cumm), and a 30 yd. pass in the third quarter (2 pt. conversion completed by Cumm). 

N. Abruscato rounded off their scoring in the fourth quarter with a 2 yd. TD run. 

Schuylerville had 434 total yds. (244 rushing). Top rushers for the Black Horses were: Cumm had 9 carries for 67 yds., M. Flanders had 14 carries for 55 yds., L. Sherman had 9 carries for 50 yds., and O. Sherman had 4 carries for 33 yds. Dow and Abruscato both rushed for TDs also. 

Quarterback O. Sherman was 8 for 9 for 190 yds. with 5 TDs. Lead receiver was Dow, with 7 receptions for 187 yds. and 5 TDs. 

On defense, Abruscato and C. Nastacie had fumble recoveries. 

Ogdensburg had 139 total yds. (65 rushing). Top rushers were A. Calton who rushed for 26 yds. on 3 carries, and K. England who rushed for 14 yds. on 2 carries. 

QB T. Lovely was 5 for 17 for 74 yds. 

D. Costello had 2 receptions for 39 yds., Calton had 1 reception for 20 yds., and J. McIntyre had 2 receptions for 15 yds. 

Schuylerville advances to the Class C State Semifinals on Saturday, Nov. 27 at noon at Middletown High School. They will face Dobbs Ferry, who beat James I. O’Neill 56-28. 

Burnt Hills Falls to Somers 

Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake Varsity Football Team fell to Somers in the Class A State Quarterfinals. Final score: 48-14. 

D. Marcus scored the first TD of the game in the first quarter on a 4 yd. run. Marcus also opened up the scoring in the second quarter for the Tuskers with a 32 yd. TD run. M. Kapica added a 1 yd. TD run, and M. Fitzsimons also scored on a 1 yd. TD run to make the score 28-0 at halftime. 

In the second half R. Dass scored on a 36 yd. TD run and a 52 yd. punt return. S. Swee scored on a 44 yd. TD run to round off the scoring for Somers in the fourth quarter. L. Savino was 6 for 7 on extra point attempts.

Somers kept BH-BL off the board until the fourth quarter, when R. Mareno scored the first TD for the Spartans on 25 yd. fumble recovery. J. Joseph followed up with a 38 yd. TD run with less than three minutes remaining in the game. 

Tuskers QB Fitzsimons was 11 for 12 in the first half alone and ended the game 14 for 19 for 164 yds. and 1 TD. RB Marcus had 8 carries for 51 yds. and 2 TDs. 

BH-BL’s Head Coach Shell was on the sidelines for the game after his ejection during the Section 2 Class A Superbowl against Queensbury was rescinded; officials determined that Shell was not the individual who provoked the 2 unsportsmanlike conduct penalty flags. 

Somers advances to the Class A State Semifinals, a rematch against Rye. 

Published in Sports
Thursday, 31 May 2018 13:02

Schuylerville Boys Varsity Lacrosse

Photos provided.

SCHUYLERVILLE — The Schuylerville Black Horses boy’s lacrosse team, coached by Andrew Smith, hung on by the skin of their teeth on Sunday, May 27, in their Section II Class D final game against Greenwich, winning 12-11. Relying heavily on goalie Braden Podkladek, who had 22 saves total with eight in the final quarter, Schuylerville managed to sink the win. Tyler Bowen had two goals and three assists; Justin Carte had four goals; Jace Carter had two goals and one assist; Drew Phillips had three goals and one assist; Noah Rourke had three assists; and Seth Mattice had one goal.

Schuylerville had four goals in the first and second quarters, and two goals each in the third and fourth quarters. Overall, the Black Horses were 16-3 for the season.

ROSTER:

#1 Tyler Bowen • Sophomore
#3 Jacob Vanderhoof • Sophomore
#4 Ben Follos • Junior
#5 Justin Carte • Junior
#6 Jace Carter • Senior
#8 Drew Phillips • Junior
#9 Braden Podkladek • Senior
#11 Noah Rourke • Junior
#12 Logan Durr • Junior
#13 Trent Thomas • Senior
#14 Sean Swenson • Sophomore
#15 Dylan Carpenter • Sophomore
#16 Seth Mattice • Junior
#17 Reese Taveres • Sophomore
#18 Samuel Levin • Junior
#19 Brandon Craft • Junior
#20 Ethan Dubrey • Sophomore
#21 Kyle Burnham • Sophomore
#22 Jared Thivierge • Junior
#23 Riley Tavares • Junior
#24 Cade Delisle • Junior
#25 Thomas Donovan • Senior
#26 Jack Nemer • Sophomore
#27 Trevor Vanarnum • Junior
#28 Mike Barcia • Junior
#29 Colin Garry • Freshman
#30 Erich Steg • Junior

Published in Sports
Friday, 23 September 2016 13:42

Lady Horses Trample Glens Falls

SCHUYLERVILLE — The Lady Horses trampled Glens Falls on Wednesday, September 21 with a score of 13-0. Nine Schuylerville players tallied goals, including firsts of the season for Alexa Goldenberg (2), Emma Delaney (2; First Varsity or JV goals, ever); and Ashley Flynn (First Varsity goal). Maddy Nevins had 2 goals and 4 assists. Glens Falls Goalkeeper, Makayla Bennett, a recent JV call-up, played courageously, making 22 saves.

Schuylerville coach Mike Kopp said, “Our team is having an excellent start, currently in first place in the Foot Hills Council. State rankings just came out and we’re ranking 15th for the entire NYS for class B. I’m excited for this year. We brought a lot of our kids back from last year, a lot of experience coming back, and the new faces are fitting in seamlessly – it’s been a dream season so far.”

Co-captains Maddy Nevins and Amy Moreau lead the team. “They are top players,” said Kopp, “unselfish, really all about the team.” Junior Emily Vallee leads the team scoring, and freshman Cassandra Cooper leads the team with assists.

Before the game, Kopp said the team had only surrendered one goal in the last 420 minutes of play, over five games. “Pretty incredible stuff,” he said. “I am supremely proud. These kids are honors students, they volunteer, it’s great parenting. It’s a good time to be a coach for Schuylerville soccer, I can tell you that.”

Kickin' Out Cancer

The Schuylerville girls soccer team will also lead the charge for the fourth annual Kickin' Out Cancer fundraiser at a game vs Johnstown scheduled for Monday, September 26, 7 p.m. Monetary donations will be collected and pink balloons can be purchased for the inspirational halftime walk around the track. All proceeds will be donated to the American Cancer Society. 

B-Spa Boys Soccer

Tuesday afternoon September 20, Ballston Spa hosted Shenendehowa. It was a big match for both teams as it was televised by TWC sports and created a lot of hype. Shen dominated most of the possession and found their midfielders and the strikers well throughout the game. Ballston Spa looked to play long balls to the wings and beat the outside backs with their speed. The game went scoreless throughout both halves. Shen's Nick Evans scored from Derek Nolan to give Shen the victory in OT. Both teams fought very hard.

Published in Sports

SARATOGA SPRINGS – The Saratoga Regional YMCA (SRY) has a goal: to make sure that everyone who wants to go to the Y is able to. Through their Annual Scholarship Campaign program, SRY has provided countless memberships over the years to those who otherwise wouldn’t be able to afford it. This year, the Scholarship Campaign is called Mission 443, and represents the goal of the 443 memberships SRYMCA hopes to provide in 2016.

Mark Ventra has been going to the YMCA Saratoga Springs Branch for over five years, sometimes going five days a week. As a traveling salesman, the Y staff was sometimes the only people he would see on a regular basis besides his family, and he loved how welcoming and caring they all were. However, if it wasn’t for the Y’s Scholarship Campaign last year, Ventra would have had to stop going.

“A year ago, I was diagnosed with a form of leukemia. At the same time, my job was going through financial difficulties and couldn’t afford to pay me any longer, so I was let go,” explained Ventra.

When Ventra approached John Higgins, Director of the Saratoga Springs Branch, and explained to him how he wasn’t going to be able to afford to renew his membership, Higgins simply told him, “We’ll take care of it.”

“I never thought I’d need a scholarship,” said Ventra. “I always thought the scholarships were for people that weren’t as well off as I had been. I used to never give it a second thought about volunteering or giving $100 to the scholarship fund, and now, I couldn’t even pay for my own membership. I wasn’t looking for a handout, but they helped me anyway, no questions asked.”

Published in News
Monday, 28 March 2016 09:10

Saratoga Bridges Delivers

SARATOGA SPRINGS –For over 55 years, Saratoga Bridges has been providing optimum services for people with disabilities, from their residential programs to their day services and beyond. As March is Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month, it’s important to highlight how vital Saratoga Bridges has been in integrating those with disabilities into the community. Volunteering is a big part of these efforts, and individuals at Saratoga Bridges volunteer at dozens of non-profits across the county. One of these volunteer opportunities is with the Saratoga County Office for the Aging’s Home Delivered Meals program.

“Saratoga Bridges helps us to deliver hot, nutritious meals to seniors in Saratoga County,” said Billie Jo McConkey, County Nutrition Coordinator at Office for the Aging. “With the help of the Bridges groups we are able to exist on mainly volunteers to deliver to our 39 meal routes throughout Saratoga County.”

Currently, there are 9 groups of volunteers from Saratoga Bridges that help with Home Delivered Meals –roughly 100 volunteers total. They deliver meals every day, except for weekends, holidays and during extreme weather.

“Our site managers and clients enjoy seeing the Saratoga Bridges folks,” continued McConkey. “We have a symbiotic relationship that helps both of our organizations and we are thankful for their help.”

Dacia Saville, one of the volunteers from Saratoga Bridges, enjoys making the rounds to seniors’ homes and ensuring that they have healthy meals.

“It makes me feel good,” she said. “I love to help the people, they’re so nice.”

Another volunteer, Brian Burnett, is equally glad to be a part of something that helps so many people.

“Elderly people are sometimes unable to cook and do grocery shopping,” said Burnett. “So you’re given the chance to make someone’s day.”

For Catherine Holbrook, a recipient of the Home Delivered Meals, the volunteers that deliver to her home are a godsend. Holbrook had spinal surgery several years ago, which is when she first found out about Home Delivered Meals. Holbrook lives by herself in her apartment, and finds it hard to cook on her own because of her bad eyesight.

“It makes it very easy to have a complete nourishing meal without having to struggle over the stove,” said Holbrook. “If it wasn’t for the delivered meals, I’d probably have to go to a nursing home or rely on my family more for help.”

When it comes to the volunteers from Saratoga Bridges, Holbrook loves how friendly and helpful they are.

“They’re just pleasant people, a happy group that enjoys helping me,” she said. “I’m very content with the services they give. It has helped me stay more independent and live in my apartment by myself. It’s a life-saver for me, that is for sure.”

Individuals from Saratoga Bridges not only help with the Home Delivered Meals program, they engage in volunteerism at many local charitable organizations. For example, Saville and Burnett both regularly volunteer at local animal shelters, firehouses, ambulance rescue squads, the Elks Club, and more. 

“My favorite part is giving back to the community,” said Burnett. “People should volunteer because it makes you feel good about yourself.”

When they not volunteering, they like to create artwork for Saratoga Bridges’ own art gallery and studio, Creative Endeavors, as well as practice their Special Olympics events. Saville particularly likes swimming and track and field, while Burnett focuses on cross-country skiing, horseback riding, track and field, and bowling. With their wide range of hobbies, volunteer work, and activism, people at Saratoga Bridges are shattering stereotypes of people living with a disability.

“People with disabilities can do all kinds of things. There may be certain limitations, but it does not mean we’re dumb. We just have a different way of doing things,” remarked Burnett. “Disabled doesn’t mean unable.”

Volunteer opportunities also provide individuals at Saratoga Bridges the skills and training they need for employment. Saratoga Bridges has programs, such as Alpha Career Options, that help people with disabilities find jobs in the community. They can be found working at businesses such as Stewart’s, Walmart, Price Chopper and more – all places where they can be directly involved in the community, interacting and building those necessary skills.

“The individuals we support are blended into the fabric of the community. They have a variety of disabilities, and also a variety of abilities and talents,” said Pamela Polacsek, communications specialist at Saratoga Bridges. “They never fail to impress me with how profound they are and explicit in the way they express themselves. They value and appreciate what life is all about.”

Polacsek, as well as the other staff members at Saratoga Bridges, are passionate about the work they do and the individuals they serve daily.

“I work with a bunch of dedicated, compassionate staff members whose goal is to give people the opportunities to succeed,” continued Polacsek. “Giving support within our agency, as well as through these volunteer sites and businesses that employ our individuals, is encouraging, it’s enriching. I think it enhances the whole community when people are accepted for who they are.”

For more information about Saratoga Bridges, including their services and extensive charitable work, visit saratogabridges.org. For more information about Home Delivered Meals, or if interested in being a volunteer in the program, call the Office for the Aging at 518-363-4020.

 

Published in News
Thursday, 03 December 2015 10:11

Investigation Into Missing Councilman Continues

Sheriffs Seek Information About Fred “Fritzie” Drumm

SARATOGA – The whereabouts of Fred “Fritzie” Drumm, 68, of Burgoyne Road in the Town of Saratoga, are still undetermined according to the Saratoga County Sheriff’s Office. Drumm, who is a Councilman for the Town of Saratoga, was reported missing by his family on Wednesday, November 25. The Sheriff’s Office is continuing to actively investigate leads in the case. 

 

According to the Sheriff Department’s Lieutenant Jeffrey Brown, a search of the ground and waterways surrounding the area that Drumm was last seen began immediately after the family reported his disappearance. A total of more than 200 people have participated in the search for Drumm. In addition to the Sheriffs, other agencies involved in the search included Saratoga County fire agencies, the New York State Federation of Search and Rescue Teams, members of the Saratoga County Sheriff's Office and New York State DEC Forest Rangers.An area of about 1200 acres was searched, including portions of the Hudson River by the Sheriff’s Marine Unit. 

The ground search concluded last Saturday, although Lt. Brown emphasized that the investigation is still classified as active, and the Sheriff’s Office is still continuing to focus on all leads and possible avenues that they receive regarding Drumm’s disappearance. They are continuing to request the assistance of the public (see below for contact information). 

The decision to suspend a ground search is determined by a variety of factors, Lt. Brown noted. It is made on a case-by-case basis by the Sheriff’s Office, and in this case was done with consultation with the Forest Rangers. Lt. Brown noted that some possible factors that are taken into account when determining the size and length of an ground search include the topography of the area of disappearance, the general health and age of the missing person, time of year and weather conditions. 

 

Anyone with knowledge or information regarding the possible whereabouts of Mr. Drumm are requested to contact the Sheriff's Office at 518-885- 6761.

 

Published in News

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Domestic violence is the number two violent crime in Saratoga County, the primary cause of family homelessness, and one of the top two causes of homicide. In fact, from 2010 to 2013, 100 percent of homicides in Saratoga County were because of domestic violence.

According to Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, one in four women and one in seven men will be the victim of domestic violence at some point in their life. As October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, it is key to look at the statistics and learn about how domestic abuse affects our loved ones, our society and even ourselves.

Wellspring is a fully comprehensive relationship and sexual abuse service for Saratoga County. Previously called Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Services for Saratoga County (DVRC), Wellspring helps victims of domestic violence, while simultaneously providing prevention education for the community.

“We have so many services that can help people before a crisis and that can avert a crisis,” said Maggie Fronk, the Executive Director of Wellspring for the past 14 years. “With our other name, it said “crisis” so many people didn’t think they could come in until after the crisis. Wellspring is really promoting all of the things we do to help people be safe, and ultimately, avoid that crisis.”

The vision for Wellspring is a Saratoga County free of abuse, and awareness is vital to that vision. Domestic violence is more prevalent in the community than anyone realizes, and it’s much more than physical abuse. Domestic violence can manifest as emotional abuse, sexual abuse, isolation, economic abuse and psychological abuse. These many forms of domestic violence often occur together.

“I think one of the biggest myths is that domestic violence is only physical. It can be, yet there can be highly abusive relationships that have no physical abuse at all,” said Fronk.

A stereotype exists that domestic violence only happens to certain people. In reality, all socio-economic groups, all races, all religions and all genders are affected by domestic violence. According to Fronk, this stereotype may exist because domestic violence is a crime that happens in the home, outside of public view.

It is never easy to make the first step in reaching out for help, but Wellspring tries to make it uncomplicated and nonintimidating.

“Just call and make an appointment, or if need be, just walk in the door. All our services are free and confidential,” said Fronk. “We respond to what your needs are. One person might come in and be ready to leave the abuse, go to a shelter and get an order of protection. Another person may just want to talk about what’s happening and find out if it is an abusive relationship. It is driven by the needs of whoever is walking in our door for help.”

Helping over 1,000 people per year, Wellspring prioritizes what each individual needs and wants at that time, acknowledging that it is different for everyone. No one is going to be rushed to leave their abuser or pressured into steps they are not ready for. The only commonality for everyone is that they are going to be talked to about safety options, so they can be safe with whatever choice they make. There will be customized, individualized safety planning for anyone who comes into Wellspring.

One anonymous survivor who has been helped by Wellspring said, “[Wellspring] supported me and helped me when I was going through a very tough moment in my life. They were there for me when I needed someone to talk to, to advise me how to get help, supporting me during the court days. The staff was also always nice and helpful with my son. They made our stay as easy as possible. They supported us with summer camp for day care when I could not afford it so I could keep working.”

The array of services Wellsprings provides is vast. Whether someone needs counseling, legal counseling or case management, the resources are available. There are even advocates that can accompany victims to the police or to court.

Financial security is a terrifying thought for many who want to leave a violent relationship. Victims are afraid they won’t be able to support themselves and their children after leaving their abuser. Wellspring offers an eight-week financial literacy program that covers everything from knowing your assets and rights with money, to budgeting, to getting a job and growing in that career. It also helps people apply for public assistance, such as SNAP, for temporarily relief during a difficult period to get survivors back on their feet.

Wellspring has shelter and housing opportunities readily accessible. The shelter is in an undisclosed location in the county, ensuring safety and privacy.

“Some people might be coming in [to the shelter] for a few days, letting things settle down at home. Other times, they might be ready to totally change their life and have no idea where to start. Either one of those is fine,” explained Fronk. It is important to note that children and parents stay together in the shelter.

If victims still need help with housing after leaving a shelter, there is an affordable housing program with subsidized rent and support services.

Shelter is not only provided for people, either. Pets are often used as tools of coercion and control, keeping victims trapped in abusive situations. Abusers may threaten to harm or kill pets if the victim tries to leave. In turn, Wellspring developed the Safe Pet Partnership, which provides loving foster homes for all pets while a victim goes into a shelter and receives the help they need. When they are ready, families are then reunited with their pets. This program has fostered hamsters, fish, cats, dogs, and even horses, taking away the worry about pet safety when escaping domestic violence.

While Wellspring deals directly with healing and supporting victims of abuse, as well as their family, friends and pets, they are very much involved in preventing domestic violence in the first place. Wellspring’s awareness programs visit local schools, businesses and community organizations to teach about domestic violence, including what to look for and what to do if you think you or a friend may be a victim. An emphasis is put on being an active bystander, saying or doing something about it when you see violence happening.

“When you start at the high school level, you can stop this behavior from progressing into adulthood and escalating. The point is to get ahead of this,” said Fronk.

Wellspring makes getting help comfortable, inviting and shame-free. By providing a wide range of awareness, education and victim services, they are making help for domestic violence more accessible to everyone. Fronk says it perfectly: “You are not alone in this.”

 

If you or a loved one is a victim of domestic violence, or even suspects abuse, call Wellspring’s 24-hour hotline at 518-584-8188. Wellspring is located at 480 Broadway, downstairs in the Collamer building, next door to City Hall. For more information or to donate to Wellspring, visit Wellspringcares.org. 

Published in News

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Sara Cummings, a mother of two, recently went out to a popular chain restaurant and noticed that the kids there weren’t having a good time. They were fidgeting in their booths and had energy that couldn’t be contained in a regular restaurant setting. But Cummings had a plan. Her and her husband, Patrick Finch, have designed a place where parents and children can both be happy. The Saratoga’s Kids Castle, a restaurant paradise for kids, is opening its doors on August 13 to provide Saratoga with a much needed family space.

“We thought ‘I think we’re onto something here,’” said Cummings. “The community has given us a positive response and we’re really excited about it.”

Saratoga’s Kids Castle features giant structures for children to play on, such as castles and pirate ships. There are play and craft tables and dress up stations where kids can put their imaginations to work.

For children under the age of three, there is a baby and toddler play area called “Crinkle Manor,” where there are age-appropriate toys for little ones to build their cognitive development while also having fun. It is also safe for small children since they cannot enter or leave “Crinkle Manor” by themselves.

“There is no TV and no electronics, just real play and real interaction,” said Cummings.

The menu is yet another kid-friendly aspect of Saratoga’s Kids Castle. The menu was created by registered dietitian in nutrition, Nichole Doolingm of Whole Nichole Nutrition. The food is all nutritious, healthy and authentic. There are even special sections of the menu with food designed based on the age of the child. The menu is mindful of food allergies and intolerances with special menu items for both parents and children. There is also a full café menu which includes lattes, coffees, loose teas, smoothies and juices.

Sara Cummings and Patrick Finch both have a history in real-estate and operating a restaurant. In 2006, Finch purchased and operated the Saratoga City Tavern and in 2014 he renovated and opened Kings Tavern. With this experience under their belts, they are ready to take on this adventure together.

“I’m looking forward the most to the birthday parties,” Cummings explained. “A lot of the employees are in the local drama club so they’re very interactive and creative with the kids.”

There are eight detailed party packages to choose from including the Princess Spa Party, the Dragon Party and the King or Queen Party.

Adding to the festive and lively atmosphere of the restaurant/play land are large murals painted by Gretchen Tisch from Saratoga’s Paint and Sip. Interestingly, the king and queen mural overlooking the baby area is based on the likeness of Sara Cumming’s parents while the pirate room has a mural of crazy pirates based on Patrick Finch’s parents. In the kitchen area, there is a lacrosse princess mural that represents Cumming’s 13 year old daughter, Katie.

Visitors will finally get to see Saratoga’s Kids Castle on August 13, opening at 9 a.m. with a ribbon cutting tentatively scheduled for 11 a.m.  Hours will be Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. On the weekend, it is open from 5 to 7 p.m. with a special focus on birthday parties during the day. Admission is $10 for all-day play per child. From 4:30 to 7 p.m., admission is free. There are also monthly passes available.

 

Saratoga’s Kids Castle is located at 26B Congress Plaza in Saratoga Springs. For more information please visit saratogaskidscastle.com/

Published in News

SARATOGA COUNTY – The Sage Colleges is expanding its Capital Region footprint. The private, liberal arts college has announced it will soon begin offering a Master of Business Administration program at the Hudson Valley Community College (HVCC) TEC-SMART facility in Malta this fall.

Aside from Empire State College, no other higher education institution offers MBA programs in the Saratoga area.

“There really aren’t a lot of choices, particularly for an MBA, up towards the North Country,” explained Kimberly Fredericks, Ph.D., associate dean of Sage’s School of Management. “We know that there’s a niche up there. It’s a growing community – Saratoga, Malta…really Saratoga County in its entirety is a growing community, and we wanted to make education accessible and flexible.”

Administrators say classes will be offered in an accelerated format – two classes one night a week- evenings from 6 to 10 p.m. The fall 2015 classes will include “Management of Change and Innovation” and “Human Resource Management.” It is the same MBA program offered at Sage’s Albany location, only now it’s accessible in Malta. 

“So many kids and adults are driving a long distance, so I’m going to either catch them on their way to work or next door to their employers so education can be accessible, affordable and flexible,” said Frederickson. “We cater to working adults in all of our graduate programs currently. We have night classes and sometimes once a week or even once a month because everybody works.”

The professional MBA program is designed to develop leaders who can manage complex organizations and who have the desire and capability to move into high-level positions. For nearly three decades, Sage MBA graduates have taken major leadership roles in business, government, health care and non-profit organizations. The program is accredited by the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education (IACBE).

Fredericks says the college may add coursework for additional programs in the future, but wanted to start with an MBA program because of Malta’s growing business community; like the Luther Forest Technology Campus (LFTC) for example.

“Because we’re a smaller institution, we can be flexible. We have some skill sets in our faculty that not everybody has,” says Fredericks. “For example, we have an intellectual property attorney who can do things with patents, intellectual property or tech transfer that might be attractive to that market up in Malta.” 

Due to its location at HVCC TEC-SMART, Fredericks also explained it puts the college in a good position to potentially offer continuing education coursework or seminars to the more than 3,000 employees at LFTC.

“We love being part of the community. We listen to the business community and adapt to what skill sets they want employees to have and we listen to our students and I’m able to put on electives and try certain courses out, because we’re smaller,” said Frederickson.

So far it seems as though Sage’s MBA program in Saratoga County is being well-received. The program has reached its cap at 30 students for the upcoming fall semester. However, applications are still being accepted and Frederickson says adjustments can be made to fit a high demand. 

In the next year, school administrators say they hope to see the program grow and become a partner in the Saratoga County community.  The five-year goal for the college’s “Sage in Saratoga” initiative is to offer more graduate- and undergraduate-level programs.

The Sage Colleges is the university to have a presence in three counties – Albany, Rensselaer and now Saratoga.

 

To learn more about The Sage Colleges MBA program in Malta, visit sage.edu/management

Published in News
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Blotter

  • COURT  Billy R. Hendrie, 30, of Plattsburg, was sentenced Jan. 12 to 3 years of incarceration and 1-1/2 years of post-release supervision, after pleading to felony attempted criminal possession of a controlled substance, in Wilton.    Sonja N. Ambrosino, 41, of Amsterdam, was sentenced Jan. 12 to 2 months incarceration and 5 years of probation, after pleading to felony grand larceny, in Halfmoon.  Dylan K. Vella, 28, of Corinth, was sentenced Jan. 11 to 20 years-to-life, in connection with the murder of Paul Hollenbeck, according to a statement released by the Saratoga County District Attorney’s Office. Vella was charged with…

Property Transactions

  • BALLSTON BDC Cornerstone LLC sold property at 55 Anthony Pl to Eugene Viti for $345,486. Traditional Home Builders and Developers sold property at 21 Mallory Way to Matthew Hall for $418,500. James Giannone sold property at 2 Miller Ct to James Margiotta for $506,500. Charles Russell sold property at 117 Charlton Rd to Michael Wizner for $325,000. Barbera Homes Kelley Farms sold property at 11 Stablegate Dr to Andrew Collar for $566,204. CORINTH David Kirchoff sold property at 222 Oak St to Bryan Eaton for $220,000. GALWAY Andrew Hathaway sold property at 9040 Nassell Dr to Rick Percoco for $250,000.…
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